Author: Rachika Marx-Badenhorst

Bibliophile. Logophile. Cinephile. Wife to @Jurgen__marx. Mom to Matteo, Zoë and Phoebe. #relativelyontrack

Lehlogonolo Mashaba is a bit of a science geek if we had to call a spade a spade. He is fascinated with the breaking down of matter to its smallest form, which through his interpretation could be an atom of a physical body or the smallest part of a word, or the smallest fraction of a number. Though there is a sense of chaos, his explosive work does not happen haphazardly. He believes in the order of things, in fact we had to smile at his consistent ordering and reordering of the contents of his studio and work-space during the…

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Where I was standing in the legendary David Koloane’s studio at The Bag Factory, the sounds of the streets of Joburg and the scratching of charcoal on paper was the soundtrack to his day. He says he loves the energy of the city and at the ripe old age of 77, he still comes to the studio at least four days a week. There is no rest for an artist he says, no matter how well-known he might be. His work space is nothing glamorous, with charcoal dust colouring the floor, splashes of paint which at some stage flew through…

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It is with a heavy heart that I write this post after the very sad passing of art and antiques connoisseur, Stephan Welz. Jurgen and I had the wonderful privilege of spending time with him during the last three months of 2015, not knowing that we would in fact be capturing some of his final days. In my mind I imagined a good, long, old-fashioned tête-à-tête with this legend, where I could ask him about his view on… well, just about everything, but reality was far from this. His schedule was something a 20-year-old would have found difficult to keep…

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If you had to meet Layziehound Coka somewhere in passing, you won’t be blamed for mistaking him for some hip-hop/rapper kind of guy. His birth-name Layziehound doesn’t do much to send you in another direction and though I never quite got to the root of it, apparently it came from his grandfather. According to Layziehound, this grandfather was quite the character… he always, always wore a suit, no matter what the weather. He also hardly ever wore shoes, which he sold at the local shebeen for drinks. So the suited, barefoot grandfather left our featured artist with the distinctive signature:…

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We sat down at the beautiful Winston Hotel in Johannesburg to chat to Claire Robertson about her new book, The Magistrate of Gower. Claire’s publishers describe her as the author of The Spiral House, winner of the 2014 Sunday Times Fiction Prize and a South African Literary Award, and short-listed for the University of Johannesburg Debut Prize. Of course this doesn’t say much about Claire as a person, but succeeds in very quickly giving you an idea of just how brilliant an author she is. Robertson has an impressive collage of storytelling that she has collected over the more than…

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Gert-Johan Coetzee’s rise to fame is the stuff that fairy-tales are made of. Growing up in one of the most conservative farming communities in the North West province of South Africa could not have been easy for someone who was probably not born with one rural bone in his body. Gert was still a toddler when his parents knew that he wasn’t going to follow in his father’s footsteps of being a commercial farmer. His mom also knew that the traditional schooling system wouldn’t work for him, so she home-schooled him. At the age of 16 he was studying fashion…

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Walking into Mandy Coppes-Martin’s studio in Newtown, Johannesburg was… strange; like walking into an apothecary’s back room in mid-century Europe. Life-size rats made of the finest Madagascan silk and antique lace imported from China by Mandy’s grandmother, seemed to be lounging comfortably on tables and chairs. The pungent smell of Chinese starch glue filled the air and bizarrely mismatched and seemingly unrelated objects were hanging from the walls and windows. A concoction of silk thread slowly unraveling from cocoons, soaked in coloured water on a stove in the corner of the room and webs of thread seemed to be growing…

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Benon Lutaaya is currently one of Africa’s most publicised and sought after young artists both locally and internationally. If you have ever questioned whether art is an investment, I suggest you have a look at the exponential growth in the value of his work over the past few years and there seems to be no end to this continuing upward trend. An entrepreneur with great convictions. He refuses to follow the easy way out, refuses to accept a closed-door and refuses to stagnate. He works 7 days a week, 16 hours a day, every day, to ensure that he is…

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At 6h00 on one of the coldest days of the year, we met Bevan Cullinan on set to watch him direct his latest commercial for McDonald’s – Karou don’t cry. He is a self-proclaimed perfectionist, who plans every possible detail of the shoot, leaving nothing to chance, seemingly counter-intuitive for someone who basically became famous for his ability to capture an audience through what often came across as incidental improvisation. I first heard of Bevan while studying Drama at Wits university. As Physical theatre students we all knew about his unique brand of physical performance, specifically his comedy. Most of…

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The film industry is not for sissies. You work really long hours, you usually end up all sweaty and dusty (which is never a pleasant combination) and you lug a ton of stuff around from place to place the whole day. You also very rarely get to see the picture you’re helping to create and the people you work with are a rare breed of interesting, quirky and often temperamental. I’m addicted to the feeling I get, when all the elements come together perfectly and I am able to capture it. What I’m trying to tell you is that there…

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